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small Yemenite Shofar horn High quality

Regular price $0.00 $109.00

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Short Description:

High quality,  made in Israel.

Size (inch): 31.5-35
Size (cm): 80-89
Each Shofar is made from African Kudu Horn and comes with a polished finish. Every Shofar is checked before shipping. The Shofars are made by The Ribak Family in Tel-Aviv.

The Ribak Family arrived in Israel from Poland about 70 years ago, being of the first citizens of Tel-Aviv. The family members brought along, from their country of origin, old equipment for the production of Shofarot. Today the new generation continues making shofarot according to the family tradition using modern methods to produce the finest  in Israel.

 

Shofars are curved and polished horns with openings at the top and bottom. They are typically made from a ram’s horn. According to Jewish Law, a Shofar may not be made from a cow’s horn or from a calf’s horn, since this is suggestive of the worship of the Golden Calf as condemned in the Torah (Old Testament).

 

The Ribak Family arrived in Israel from Poland about 70 years ago, being of the first citizens of Tel-Aviv. The family members brought along, from their country of origin, old equipment for the production of Shofarot. Today the new generation continues making shofarot according to the family tradition using modern methods to produce the finest in Israel.

 

With practice, anyone can learn to properly blow the Shofar. One who blows the Shofar is known as a Tokea, which translates to "Blaster." It can become quite strenuous to blow the Shofar on certain days of observance. However, agood Tokea knows that blowing the Shofar is comparable to blowing a trumpet or bugle. The Shofar takes less effort when placed to one side of the mouth, and by vibrating the lips.

On the Jewish festival of, the Shofar is blown 100 times to signify the New Year. It is also blown at the end of the Yom Kippur service to signify that this day of repentance and remembrance has come to an end.

According to Jewish tradition, the Shofar is not used on Sabbath since the Tokea might accidentally carry the horn from place to place. This constitutes work, and is thus forbidden on the Sabbath. Even during the days following Rosh Hashanah, any day falling on the Sabbath does not include Shofar blasts.

 

The sounds of the Shofar are meant to awake and inspire the Jew, or alternately used as an announcement that one is being called to consider spiritual matters. This may be accomplished with three different sounds made by the Shofar. One short blast is called the Tekiah. Three short notes played consecutively are called Shever, and Teru’ah, is the name given for nine quick notes played one after the other.

Care must be taken to keep the Shofar from damage. A damaged Shofar will not produce sound properly, especially if there are any holes in the horn aside from the two main ones. With practice, anyone can master the Shofar and create powerful blasts as part of a meaningful religious service.

With practice, anyone can learn to properly blow the Shofar. One who blows the Shofar is known as a Tokea, which translates to "Blaster." It can become quite strenuous to blow the Shofar on certain days of observance. However, agood Tokea knows that blowing the Shofar is comparable to blowing a trumpet or bugle. The Shofar takes less effort when placed to one side of the mouth, and by vibrating the lips.

On the Jewish festival of  the Shofar is blown 100 times to signify the New Year. It is also blown at the end of the Yom Kippur service to signify that this day of repentance and remembrance has come to an end.

According to Jewish tradition, the Shofar is not used on Sabbath since the Tokea might accidentally carry the horn from place to place. This constitutes work, and is thus forbidden on the Sabbath. Even during the days following Rosh Hashanah, any day falling on the Sabbath does not include Shofar blasts.

 

The sounds of the Shofar are meant to awake and inspire the Jew, or alternately used as an announcement that one is being called to consider spiritual matters. This may be accomplished with three different sounds made by the Shofar. One short blast is called the Tekiah. Three short notes played consecutively are called Shever, and Teru’ah, is the name given for nine quick notes played one after the other.

Care must be taken to keep the Shofar from damage. A damaged Shofar will not produce sound properly, especially if there are any holes in the horn aside from the two main ones. With practice, anyone can master the Shofar and create powerful blasts as part of a meaningful religious service.

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High quality,  made in Israel.

Size (inch): 31.5-35
Size (cm): 80-89
Each Shofar is made from African Kudu Horn and comes with a polished finish. Every Shofar is checked before shipping. The Shofars are made by The Ribak Family in Tel-Aviv.

The Ribak Family arrived in Israel from Poland about 70 years ago, being of the first citizens of Tel-Aviv. The family members brought along, from their country of origin, old equipment for the production of Shofarot. Today the new generation continues making shofarot according to the family tradition using modern methods to produce the finest  in Israel.

 

Shofars are curved and polished horns with openings at the top and bottom. They are typically made from a ram’s horn. According to Jewish Law, a Shofar may not be made from a cow’s horn or from a calf’s horn, since this is suggestive of the worship of the Golden Calf as condemned in the Torah (Old Testament).

 

The Ribak Family arrived in Israel from Poland about 70 years ago, being of the first citizens of Tel-Aviv. The family members brought along, from their country of origin, old equipment for the production of Shofarot. Today the new generation continues making shofarot according to the family tradition using modern methods to produce the finest in Israel.

 

With practice, anyone can learn to properly blow the Shofar. One who blows the Shofar is known as a Tokea, which translates to "Blaster." It can become quite strenuous to blow the Shofar on certain days of observance. However, agood Tokea knows that blowing the Shofar is comparable to blowing a trumpet or bugle. The Shofar takes less effort when placed to one side of the mouth, and by vibrating the lips.

On the Jewish festival of, the Shofar is blown 100 times to signify the New Year. It is also blown at the end of the Yom Kippur service to signify that this day of repentance and remembrance has come to an end.

According to Jewish tradition, the Shofar is not used on Sabbath since the Tokea might accidentally carry the horn from place to place. This constitutes work, and is thus forbidden on the Sabbath. Even during the days following Rosh Hashanah, any day falling on the Sabbath does not include Shofar blasts.

 

The sounds of the Shofar are meant to awake and inspire the Jew, or alternately used as an announcement that one is being called to consider spiritual matters. This may be accomplished with three different sounds made by the Shofar. One short blast is called the Tekiah. Three short notes played consecutively are called Shever, and Teru’ah, is the name given for nine quick notes played one after the other.

Care must be taken to keep the Shofar from damage. A damaged Shofar will not produce sound properly, especially if there are any holes in the horn aside from the two main ones. With practice, anyone can master the Shofar and create powerful blasts as part of a meaningful religious service.

With practice, anyone can learn to properly blow the Shofar. One who blows the Shofar is known as a Tokea, which translates to "Blaster." It can become quite strenuous to blow the Shofar on certain days of observance. However, agood Tokea knows that blowing the Shofar is comparable to blowing a trumpet or bugle. The Shofar takes less effort when placed to one side of the mouth, and by vibrating the lips.

On the Jewish festival of  the Shofar is blown 100 times to signify the New Year. It is also blown at the end of the Yom Kippur service to signify that this day of repentance and remembrance has come to an end.

According to Jewish tradition, the Shofar is not used on Sabbath since the Tokea might accidentally carry the horn from place to place. This constitutes work, and is thus forbidden on the Sabbath. Even during the days following Rosh Hashanah, any day falling on the Sabbath does not include Shofar blasts.

 

The sounds of the Shofar are meant to awake and inspire the Jew, or alternately used as an announcement that one is being called to consider spiritual matters. This may be accomplished with three different sounds made by the Shofar. One short blast is called the Tekiah. Three short notes played consecutively are called Shever, and Teru’ah, is the name given for nine quick notes played one after the other.

Care must be taken to keep the Shofar from damage. A damaged Shofar will not produce sound properly, especially if there are any holes in the horn aside from the two main ones. With practice, anyone can master the Shofar and create powerful blasts as part of a meaningful religious service.

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